• Français
  • English

séminaire – jeudi 16 janvier 2020

Linking early-life effects to life-long performances: what can ageing markers tell us?

Sophie Reichert, TCSM research fellow, University of Turku, Finland

jeudi 16 janvier 2020 à 11 heures, salle du conseil Biogéosciences

 

One fundamental aspect of evolutionary biology is to understand what factors shape variation in life-history trajectories, and to identify what are the underlying molecular and physiological mechanisms. Indeed, trade-offs can be considered as the result of physiological or molecular mechanisms generating negative consequences for other traits, thereby constraining the expression of multi-related traits and leading to a variability of life histories. In this context, mechanisms involved in ageing are likely to be of considerable importance to understand how the life-history trade-offs are shaped. To distinguish between the evolutionary causes of ageing and to understand the circumstances under which they apply, we need to investigate the mechanistic processes responsible for ageing. Ageing and its consequences on lifespan are complex and involve multiple mechanisms at different levels. My research aims to characterize the environmental factors and stressors influencing the physiological mechanisms underlying ageing, how this could underpin evolutionary trade-offs, and how it explains the inter-individual variability observed in the patterns of senescence. One process posited to play an important role in ageing is telomere attrition. Telomeres are the end sections of chromosomes that control cell replication capacity and cellular senescence. They offer great potential as they reflect ageing rates and are linked to lifestyle conditions and senescence. The purpose of this seminar will be to give an overview of my past and current research examining the mechanisms of ageing (telomere dynamics and oxidative stress) and their potential role in underlying life-history trade-offs. I will more specifically focus on early-life conditions effects, given their well-established long-term consequences for health and lifespan.

extrait:
lien_externe:
kc_data:
a:8:{i:0;s:0:"";s:4:"mode";s:0:"";s:3:"css";s:0:"";s:9:"max_width";s:0:"";s:7:"classes";s:0:"";s:9:"thumbnail";s:0:"";s:9:"collapsed";s:0:"";s:9:"optimized";s:0:"";}
kc_raw_content:

Linking early-life effects to life-long performances: what can ageing markers tell us?

Sophie Reichert, TCSM research fellow, University of Turku, Finland

jeudi 16 janvier 2020 à 11 heures, salle du conseil Biogéosciences

 

One fundamental aspect of evolutionary biology is to understand what factors shape variation in life-history trajectories, and to identify what are the underlying molecular and physiological mechanisms. Indeed, trade-offs can be considered as the result of physiological or molecular mechanisms generating negative consequences for other traits, thereby constraining the expression of multi-related traits and leading to a variability of life histories. In this context, mechanisms involved in ageing are likely to be of considerable importance to understand how the life-history trade-offs are shaped. To distinguish between the evolutionary causes of ageing and to understand the circumstances under which they apply, we need to investigate the mechanistic processes responsible for ageing. Ageing and its consequences on lifespan are complex and involve multiple mechanisms at different levels. My research aims to characterize the environmental factors and stressors influencing the physiological mechanisms underlying ageing, how this could underpin evolutionary trade-offs, and how it explains the inter-individual variability observed in the patterns of senescence. One process posited to play an important role in ageing is telomere attrition. Telomeres are the end sections of chromosomes that control cell replication capacity and cellular senescence. They offer great potential as they reflect ageing rates and are linked to lifestyle conditions and senescence. The purpose of this seminar will be to give an overview of my past and current research examining the mechanisms of ageing (telomere dynamics and oxidative stress) and their potential role in underlying life-history trade-offs. I will more specifically focus on early-life conditions effects, given their well-established long-term consequences for health and lifespan.

titre:
Linking early-life effects to life-long performances: what can ageing markers tell us?
intervenant:
Sophie Reichert
date:
jeudi 16 janvier 2020

Log In

Create an account