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séminaire – mercredi 8 janvier 2020

Dynamic mechanisms of species coexistence: Empirical studies in Anolis lizards and Rhabdomys mice

Claire Dufour, Center of Evolutionary and Functional Ecology CEFE, team Ecologie Spatiale des Populations. Montpellier, France / Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA

mercredi 8 janvier 2020, à 11 heures, amphithéâtre Courtois

 

Invasive species are a global scourge. Nonetheless, they provide the appropriate evolutionary setting to rigorously test the role that interspecific competition play in species evolution. The introduction of Anolis cristatellus to Dominica, a Caribbean island where Anolis oculatus — a closely related native species — occurs, offers a rare opportunity to study the coexistence processes at fine spatial and temporal scales. With an empirical approach in the field, we considered simultaneously the role of resource-use and interference competitions in the evolution of ecological, behavioral, morphological and performance traits by comparing populations in area where the species are present either alone (allopatry) or co-occur (sympatry). We revealed the presence of a two-step ecological character displacement: in sympatry, habitat divergence occurred rapidly but was associated with morphological divergence only after decade(s) of coexistence. In areas where the two species came into contact only few years ago, we then demonstrated a communication behavioral shift in the invasive species related to indirect or direct competition. Moreover, thanks to realistic lizard robots, we simulated interference competition in natura and determined the presence of a rapid agonistic character displacement in display behavior of the native species. Such behavioral shift linked to interspecific competition may cause profound changes in intraspecific interactions as we shown in anole lizards. A particular focus on this new view of species coexistence will be illustrated by an empirical study on South African mice (genus Rhabdomys). Particularly, how interference and resource use competition between two sister species of Rhabdomys may impact their intraspecific sociality (e.g. group size and association strength). The consideration of species sociality in the interspecific relationships (consequence and outcome) appears as a promising new avenue in species coexistence research.

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Dynamic mechanisms of species coexistence: Empirical studies in Anolis lizards and Rhabdomys mice

Claire Dufour, Center of Evolutionary and Functional Ecology CEFE, team Ecologie Spatiale des Populations. Montpellier, France / Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA

mercredi 8 janvier 2020, à 11 heures, amphithéâtre Courtois

 

Invasive species are a global scourge. Nonetheless, they provide the appropriate evolutionary setting to rigorously test the role that interspecific competition play in species evolution. The introduction of Anolis cristatellus to Dominica, a Caribbean island where Anolis oculatus — a closely related native species — occurs, offers a rare opportunity to study the coexistence processes at fine spatial and temporal scales. With an empirical approach in the field, we considered simultaneously the role of resource-use and interference competitions in the evolution of ecological, behavioral, morphological and performance traits by comparing populations in area where the species are present either alone (allopatry) or co-occur (sympatry). We revealed the presence of a two-step ecological character displacement: in sympatry, habitat divergence occurred rapidly but was associated with morphological divergence only after decade(s) of coexistence. In areas where the two species came into contact only few years ago, we then demonstrated a communication behavioral shift in the invasive species related to indirect or direct competition. Moreover, thanks to realistic lizard robots, we simulated interference competition in natura and determined the presence of a rapid agonistic character displacement in display behavior of the native species. Such behavioral shift linked to interspecific competition may cause profound changes in intraspecific interactions as we shown in anole lizards. A particular focus on this new view of species coexistence will be illustrated by an empirical study on South African mice (genus Rhabdomys). Particularly, how interference and resource use competition between two sister species of Rhabdomys may impact their intraspecific sociality (e.g. group size and association strength). The consideration of species sociality in the interspecific relationships (consequence and outcome) appears as a promising new avenue in species coexistence research.

titre:
Dynamic mechanisms of species coexistence: Empirical studies in Anolis lizards and Rhabdomys mice
intervenant:
Claire Dufour
date:
8 janvier 2020

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